Company’s Definition of “Independence”

NASDAQ Stock Market – Corporate Governance Requirements – 5605(a)(2)

5605. Board of Directors and Committees

  1. Definitions
    1. “Independent Director” means a person other than an Executive Officer or employee of the Company or any other individual having a relationship which, in the opinion of the Company’s board of directors, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director. For purposes of this rule, “Family Member” means a person’s spouse, parents, children and siblings, whether by blood, marriage or adoption, or anyone residing in such person’s home. The following persons shall not be considered independent:
      1. a director who is, or at any time during the past three years was, employed by the Company;
      2. a director who accepted or who has a Family Member who accepted any compensation from the Company in excess of $120,000 during any period of twelve consecutive months within the three years preceding the determination of independence, other than the following:
        1. compensation for board or board committee service;
        2. compensation paid to a Family Member who is an employee (other than an Executive Officer) of the Company; or
        3. benefits under a tax-qualified retirement plan, or non-discretionary compensation.

        Provided, however, that in addition to the requirements contained in this paragraph (B), audit committee members are also subject to additional, more stringent requirements under Rule 5605(c)(2).

      3. a director who is a Family Member of an individual who is, or at any time during the past three years was, employed by the Company as an Executive Officer;
      4. a director who is, or has a Family Member who is, a partner in, or a controlling Shareholder or an Executive Officer of, any organization to which the Company made, or from which the Company received, payments for property or services in the current or any of the past three fiscal years that exceed 5% of the recipient’s consolidated gross revenues for that year, or $200,000, whichever is more, other than the following:
        1. payments arising solely from investments in the Company’s securities; or
        2. payments under non-discretionary charitable contribution matching programs.
      5. a director of the Company who is, or has a Family Member who is, employed as an Executive Officer of another entity where at any time during the past three years any of the Executive Officers of the Company serve on the compensation committee of such other entity; or
      6. a director who is, or has a Family Member who is, a current partner of the Company’s outside auditor, or was a partner or employee of the Company’s outside auditor who worked on the Company’s audit at any time during any of the past three years.
      7. in the case of an investment company, in lieu of paragraphs (A)-(F), a director who is an “interested person” of the Company as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the Investment Company Act of 1940, other than in his or her capacity as a member of the board of directors or any board committee.

IM-5605. Definition of Independence — Rule 5605(a)(2)

It is important for investors to have confidence that individuals serving as Independent Directors do not have a relationship with the listed Company that would impair their independence. The board has a responsibility to make an affirmative determination that no such relationships exist through the application of Rule 5605(a)(2). Rule 5605(a)(2) also provides a list of certain relationships that preclude a board finding of independence. These objective measures provide transparency to investors and Companies, facilitate uniform application of the rules, and ease administration. Because NASDAQ does not believe that ownership of Company stock by itself would preclude a board finding of independence, it is not included in the aforementioned objective factors. It should be noted that there are additional, more stringent requirements that apply to directors serving on audit committees, as specified in Rule 5605(c).

The Rule’s reference to the “Company” includes any parent or subsidiary of the Company. The term “parent or subsidiary” is intended to cover entities the Company controls and consolidates with the Company’s financial statements as filed with the Commission (but not if the Company reflects such entity solely as an investment in its financial statements). The reference to Executive Officer means those officers covered in Rule 16a-1(f) under the Act. In the context of the definition of Family Member under Rule 5605(a)(2), the reference to marriage is intended to capture relationships specified in the Rule (parents, children and siblings) that arise as a result of marriage, such as “in-law” relationships.

The three year look-back periods referenced in paragraphs (A), (C), (E) and (F) of the Rule commence on the date the relationship ceases. For example, a director employed by the Company is not independent until three years after such employment terminates.

For purposes of paragraph (A) of the Rule, employment by a director as an Executive Officer on an interim basis shall not disqualify that director from being considered independent following such employment, provided the interim employment did not last longer than one year. A director would not be considered independent while serving as an interim officer. Similarly, for purposes of paragraph (B) of the Rule, compensation received by a director for former service as an interim Executive Officer need not be considered as compensation in determining independence after such service, provided such interim employment did not last longer than one year. Nonetheless, the Company’s board of directors still must consider whether such former employment and any compensation received would interfere with the director’s exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director. In addition, if the director participated in the preparation of the Company’s financial statements while serving as an interim Executive Officer. Rule 5605(c)(2)(A)(iii) would preclude service on the audit committee for three years.

Paragraph (B) of the Rule is generally intended to capture situations where a compensation is made directly to (or for the benefit of) the director or a Family Member of the director. For example, consulting or personal service contracts with a director or Family Member of the director would be analyzed under paragraph (B) of the Rule. In addition, political contributions to the campaign of a director or a Family Member of the director would be considered indirect compensation under paragraph (B). Non-preferential payments made in the ordinary course of providing business services (such as payments of interest or proceeds related to banking services or loans by a Company that is a financial institution or payment of claims on a policy by a Company that is an insurance company), payments arising solely from investments in the Company’s securities and loans permitted under Section 13(k) of the Act will not preclude a finding of director independence as long as the payments are non-compensatory in nature. Depending on the circumstances, a loan or payment could be compensatory if, for example, it is not on terms generally available to the public.

Paragraph (D) of the Rule is generally intended to capture payments to an entity with which the director or Family Member of the director is affiliated by serving as a partner, controlling Shareholder or Executive Officer of such entity. Under exceptional circumstances, such as where a director has direct, significant business holdings, it may be appropriate to apply the corporate measurements in paragraph (D), rather than the individual measurements of paragraph (B). Issuers should contact NASDAQ if they wish to apply the Rule in this manner. The reference to a partner in paragraph (D) is not intended to include limited partners. It should be noted that the independence requirements of paragraph (D) of the Rule are broader than Rule 10A-3(e)(8) under the Act.

Under paragraph (D), a director who is, or who has a Family Member who is, an Executive Officer of a charitable organization may not be considered independent if the Company makes payments to the charity in excess of the greater of 5% of the charity’s revenues or $200,000. However, NASDAQ encourages Companies to consider other situations where a director or their Family Member and the Company each have a relationship with the same charity when assessing director independence.

For purposes of determining whether a lawyer is eligible to serve on an audit committee, Rule 10A-3 under the Act generally provides that any partner in a law firm that receives payments from the issuer is ineligible to serve on that issuer’s audit committee. In determining whether a director may be considered independent for purposes other than the audit committee, payments to a law firm would generally be considered under Rule 5605(a)(2), which looks to whether the payment exceeds the greater of 5% of the recipient’s gross revenues or $200,000; however, if the firm is a sole proprietorship, Rule 5605(a)(2)(B), which looks to whether the payment exceeds $120,000, applies.

Paragraph (G) of the Rule provides a different measurement for independence for investment companies in order to harmonize with the Investment Company Act of 1940. In particular, in lieu of paragraphs (A)-(F), a director who is an “interested person” of the Company as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the Investment Company Act of 1940, other than in his or her capacity as a member of the board of directors or any board committee, shall not be considered independent.